WordAI result for automotive niche

Discussion in 'SEO and Marketing' started by h4ns3n, Nov 24, 2016.

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  1. h4ns3n

    h4ns3n New Member

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    Hi,

    I took WordAI and Article Forge for a test run. I think both products offer a phenomenal user experience, well done on that front. However, the result of the primary feature left me a bit disappointed.

    Before I go into the results of WordAI, I wanted to mention how I tested Article Forge. I used the keyword "Steering rack" and the sub-category of "car repair", "automotive parts" and "cars and trucks". The resulting article was gibberish. Completely nonsensical. I left all the settings as they were by default.

    For WordAI I used the following text:

    The steering system consists of a series of linkages and gears that link the driver to the wheels. On most vehicles only the front wheels turn in response to the steering wheel, while the back wheels just follow along. When you make a turn, each of the front wheels has to turn at a different angle because one wheel is closer to the direction you’re turning in than the other one is (think of the “snap the whip” game).

    There’s a difference between how far you turn your steering wheel and how far the wheels of your vehicle turn during one rotation of the steering wheel. This is called the steering ratio. The more you have to turn the steering wheel to get the wheels to respond, the higher the steering ratio. To find the steering ratio, you divide one complete rotation of the steering wheel (360 degrees) by the amount of degrees the wheels turn. The steering ratio in most cars is between 12 and 20:1. For example, if the wheels on your car turn 20 degrees during one rotation of the steering wheel, the steering ratio would be 18:1 (360 divided by 20).

    The super unique result (32%) was:

    The steering system includes a set of gears and linkages that link the driver to the wheels. While the rear wheels just follow along in response to the steering wheel only the front wheels turn on most vehicles. When you create a turn, each of the front wheels needs to turn in an alternate angle because one wheel is nearer to the way you’re turning in than the other one is (think of the “snap the whip” game)

    There’s a difference between how far the wheels of your automobile turn during one rotation of the steering wheel and how far you turn your steering wheel. This really is known as the steering ratio. The more you need to turn the steering wheel to get the wheels to react, the more complex the steering ratio. The steering ratio in most cars is between 20:1. and 12


    To the product owner

    I struggled to select options where there was nested spintex offering word choices within full sentence choices. In those cases I had to manually edit the sentence and manually remove the unwanted spintex.

    After every edit, the uniqueness score reduced gradually. While the spintex is fully displayed, the uniqueness score was 70% but as I went about removing options, the value kept changing. Where possible, I tried not repeat the same words as the original.

    I would like to work with WordAI some more so I have not canceled my trial yet... I have canceled Article Forge, I'm not convinced Article forge will meet my needs.

    I primarily work within 2 niches, one is a highly technical corporate niche on data warehousing and data analysis technology, and the other is the automotive niche dealing with the undercarriage components of a car, suspension, steering, drive train and exhausts etc.

    So far these technical areas have proven a bit tricky for both WordAI and Article Forge.
     
  2. sites

    sites Active Member

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    WordAI users (and creator!) reading this thread: Which niches will work best with WordAI?
     
  3. h4ns3n

    h4ns3n New Member

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    What I would like to ask his community and the creator of WordAI and Article Forge, is when or at what point does a person justify the use of an article spinner? We know that Google will penalize content that does not read well and / or does not create a good user experience. But that could just be the hype that Google creates.

    My concern is more on the idea or notion of adding value, even on a money site, value that truly gives something to the visitor. Is there any factual evidence that people going to money sites don't read the blog posts that are created to attract the traffic in the first place? Sure we can look at metrics but that not a real indicator. When I land on a page that looks interesting and worth a read, I immediately send that page to Evernote. So my time on page is less that a few seconds.

    Continuing with my own habits, if I perform a search and I find a page the promises information in what I'm seaking and then I follow that link, if the page I land on is gibberish and nonsense, there is simply no way I'm going to buy anything. One reason is because if the website owner cannot even bother to apply correct grammar to their blog posts, then my rationale is that if I'm buying some sort of online service, then how much effort could they possibly apply to the syntax in their coding?


    After tweaking some settings in WordAI, I spun the following text:

    The steering mechanism is made up of number of equipment and linkages that link the wheels and the motorist. In reaction to to the controls simply the front wheels change of all automobiles, while the rear wheels simply follow along. When you create a change, all the front wheels must to show in another position because one wheel is nearer to the way you’re submiting than another one is (feel of the “catch the whip” match).

    There’s a distinction between the way much the wheels of your car or truck change throughout one rotation of the tyre and how much you change your controls. That is known as the steering percentage. The more you will need to to show the controls to get the wheels to react, the more complex the steering percentage. To get the steering percentage, you separate one complete rotation of the tyre (360 levels) by the sum of levels the wheels change. The percentage in many autos is between 20:1. and 1 2 By way of example, in the event the wheels in your vehicle change 20 degrees during one rotation of the tyre, the steering percentage could be 18:1 (360 divided by 20).


    Uniqueness score: 85%

    In the past 5 minutes I wrote the following text manually, without the use of any tool.

    People love their cars. We couldn’t do without them. Let’s chat about how cars go where you want them to go.

    Most cars have 4 wheels, a spare wheel (and if you’re pedantic about what’s considered a wheel, there’s a steering “wheel" too.)

    It’s a simple concept for us, turn the steering wheel and the car goes in that direction. Simple for us, but beneath your foot pedals is a marvelous array of intricate little links, connections, bobbles and bits that make it possible for you to take your car (and yourself) to wherever you want to go.

    The steering system is what makes it all possible. Your steering mechanism consists of an array of linkages and gears that ultimately connect the driver to the wheels. Most vehicles only have a steering system designed for the front wheels to turn in response to the steering wheel, while the back wheels just “go with the flow”. The genius in the steering system is that when you turn, the front wheels have to turn at a different angle because one wheel is closer to the direction you’re turning in than the other one is. And to think that all of this was invented more than a century ago.

    Time for some maths. (Or is it science?) The steering ratio is defined as the difference between how far you turn your steering wheel and how far the wheels of your vehicle turn during one rotation of the steering wheel. Yes, that’s a mouthful, but it’s an important concept to remember.

    The more you have to turn the steering wheel to get the wheels to respond, the higher the steering ratio. To find the steering ratio, you’ll divide one complete rotation of the steering wheel (360 degrees) by the amount of degrees the wheels turn. The steering ratio in most cars is between 12 and 20:1. For example, when the wheels on your car turn 20 degrees during one rotation of the steering wheel, the steering ratio should be 18:1 (360 divided by 20).

    Uniquness score unknown - will update once I have configured for copyscape.


     
  4. cardine

    cardine Administrator Staff Member

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    WordAi generally works extremely well for all niches. The niches it might have some trouble with are ones with a lot of unusual technical jargon, but WordAi should still have very little trouble with those industries.

    Obviously right now WordAi one click spinning will not be 100% perfect all the time, but I have never personally seen a niche where WordAi struggled. Generally the way WordAi works is that if WordAi struggles with an industry the issue is uniqueness, not readability. WordAi does a good job judging the likelihood a replacement will make sense so if it sees a lot of unusual and difficult technical jargon and it thinks a synonym might not make sense it will be slightly more cautious.

    Now with that being said if you have all of the default options selected we then employ a bunch of clever practices to still get the uniqueness high enough, even in instances where WordAi has to be conservative.

    We are also hard at work right now with Version 4 which should very dramatically improve both readability and uniqueness for all niches.

    So the long answer to this question is that WordAi generally does best with Ezine style articles and the worst with super technical articles, but generally it should work well with just about everything.
     
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